Blog posts

include study abroad on your resume

How to Include Study Abroad on Your Resume and Use It in Interviews

Studying abroad is a great way to develop soft skills that employers are looking for in entry-level candidates, such as adaptability, oral communication, and problem-solving. Although you improve these skills by studying and traveling abroad, it’s hard to know exactly how to include them on your resume or how to talk about them in job interviews.

You don’t want to oversell your experience and act like studying abroad was more important than any internships or previous work experience you’ve had. But you also don’t want to underplay the significance of your experience, because studying abroad does make you a more desirable job candidate and a better employee.  Here’s how to include study abroad on your resume and talk about it with potential employers.Read More »How to Include Study Abroad on Your Resume and Use It in Interviews

social media takeover

How to Get the Most Out of Your Sigma Tau Delta Social Media Takeover

sigma tau delta social media takeover

This is the face of someone who was emotionally unprepared to have her photo taken during a Sigma Tau Delta social media takeover. Read my blog post for tips on how to prepare your fellow members so they aren’t anxiety-ridden by thinking about photos being taken of them throughout your entire event.

Sigma Tau Delta offers an awesome opportunity for chapter members hosting chapter events—a social media takeover. I hosted a Sigma Tau Delta social media takeover for my chapter’s annual Christmas party in December 2016, and our chapter really enjoyed the opportunity. It was a great way to draw attention to the event, get followers and engagement on social media, spread the love for English language and literature, and interact with members worldwide.

So, if you have a chapter event coming up that you’d like to share with Sigma Tau Delta members, read more about my tips and tricks for running a successful Sigma Tau Delta social media takeover on my blog post on WORDY by Nature, the official blog of Sigma Tau Delta.Read More »How to Get the Most Out of Your Sigma Tau Delta Social Media Takeover

life and times of martin luther

The Life and Times of Martin Luther by Meike Roth-Beck

The Life and Times of Martin Luther is a 44-page picture book written by Meike Roth-Beck in German, translated to English by Laura Watkinson, and illustrated by Klaus Ensikat. It was published in English by Eerdmans Books for Young Readers and is intended for readers 7 and up

I was excited to read and review this because I’ve studied Luther and the Reformation in college courses and through my international travels. I’ve read (okay, skimmed) several biographies of Martin Luther, and I lived in Wittenberg, Germany, for two months and visited the Wartburg Castle, Eisenach, and Erfurt.Read More »The Life and Times of Martin Luther by Meike Roth-Beck

girl in snow

Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka

Girl in Snow is Danya Kukafka debut novel exploring how a small town in Colorado reacts after the most popular girl in school, Lucinda Hayes, is murdered. Three characters share the spotlight as narrators: Cameron, Lucinda’s stalker; Jade, a unpopular girl whom Lucinda was indifferent to; and Russ, a police officer who is in love with Cameron’s dad. As they tell their stories, we learn about their relationships with Lucinda and their grief, longing, love, and obsession.

Read More »Girl in Snow by Danya Kukafka
securing civil rights

Securing Civil Rights by Stephen P. Halbrook

Stephen P. Halbrook argues in Securing Civil Rights: Freedmen, the Fourteenth Amendment, and the Right to Bear Arms, Updated Edition that the Fourteenth Amendment was understood to protect the Bill of Rights, especially the Second Amendment right to bear arms, from infringement by the States. Halbrook also argues that the Supreme Court did not fully understand this argument in its decisions from the 1870s until District of Columbia v. Heller.

Read More »Securing Civil Rights by Stephen P. Halbrook

a stranger in the house

Why I’m Not Writing a Review of Shari Lapena’s A Stranger in the House

I feel like I need to 1) read more, a LOT more, and 2) write intelligent book reviews of every book I read. After all, I want to succeed in book publishing, right? And this is how you do it?

I’ve fallen victim to some weird mix of internal pressure (you need to write book reviews to advance your career) and the fear of missing out (everyone on #bookstagram writes several reviews each month) that led me to this mindset. I have to churn out book reviews, especially if I am so lucky to get my hands on an ARC or a newly released book. When I received an ARC of Shari Lapena’s latest thriller, A Stranger in the House, I felt that urge to read it just so I could write a review of it. I don’t usually read thrillers, but here it was, a golden opportunity to read a new book and showcase my book reviewing skills to the world.

Read More »Why I’m Not Writing a Review of Shari Lapena’s A Stranger in the House
three generations, no imbeciles

Three Generations, No Imbeciles by Paul Lombardo

In Three Generations, No Imbeciles: Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. Bell, Paul A. Lombardo argues that a small, zealous faction of the eugenics movement pushed for sterilization laws by exploiting Carrie Buck in a court case (Buck v. Bell) designed to set a precedent for the constitutionality of sterilization laws and protect practicing members of the eugenics community from prosecution. Lombardo successfully uses the narrative of the 1927 Buck v. Bell case to tie together different arguments and topics relating to the legal, political, and scientific (or lack of scientific) history of the eugenics movement and then shifts from the story of Buck v. Bell to its implications in current legal history. Read More »Three Generations, No Imbeciles by Paul Lombardo

career advice column

Why I’m Starting a Career Advice Column for My Alma Mater’s Campus Newspaper

Now that I’ve graduated from Concordia and left my two-year run as an editor of its campus newspaper, The Sower, I’m going to end up writing more for it as an alumna than I ever did as a student worker.

I will write a twice-monthly career advice column for Concordia students. It’s an idea I toyed with while I was managing editor of The Sower last year—I wanted to share my strategies and stories of how I built up my resume and prepared to jump headfirst into a career postgraduation. But last year was crazy for me, mostly because I was doing too much to prepare for my career instead of enjoying my last year of college. I didn’t utilize my opportunity to write for The Sower beyond a heartfelt explanation of why The Sower exists and a few Buzzfeed-esque listicles.Read More »Why I’m Starting a Career Advice Column for My Alma Mater’s Campus Newspaper