Carolina VonKampen

Editor. Reader. Writer.

Category: book review (page 2 of 2)

Securing Civil Rights by Stephen P. Halbrook

Stephen P. Halbrook argues in Securing Civil Rights: Freedmen, the Fourteenth Amendment, and the Right to Bear Arms, Updated Edition that the Fourteenth Amendment was understood to protect the Bill of Rights, especially the Second Amendment right to bear arms, from infringement by the States. Halbrook also argues that the Supreme Court did not fully understand this argument in its decisions from the 1870s until District of Columbia v. Heller.

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Why I’m Not Writing a Review of Shari Lapena’s A Stranger in the House

I feel like I need to 1) read more, a LOT more, and 2) write intelligent book reviews of every book I read. After all, I want to succeed in book publishing, right? And this is how you do it?

I’ve fallen victim to some weird mix of internal pressure (you need to write book reviews to advance your career) and the fear of missing out (everyone on #bookstagram writes several reviews each month) that led me to this mindset. I have to churn out book reviews, especially if I am so lucky to get my hands on an ARC or a newly released book. When I received an ARC of Shari Lapena’s latest thriller, A Stranger in the House, I felt that urge to read it just so I could write a review of it. I don’t usually read thrillers, but here it was, a golden opportunity to read a new book and showcase my book reviewing skills to the world. Continue reading

Executive Values by Kurt Senske

I read Kurt Senske’s book on Christian leadership for my Business Ethics class during my last semester of college. Senske’s Executive Values: A Christian Approach to Organizational Leadership explores how Christian values can support long-term organizational success. The book gives practical advice and real examples of companies and leaders who have followed Christian values and seen success because of it. Continue reading

Three Generations, No Imbeciles by Paul Lombardo

In Three Generations, No Imbeciles: Eugenics, the Supreme Court, and Buck v. Bell, Paul A. Lombardo argues that a small, zealous faction of the eugenics movement pushed for sterilization laws by exploiting Carrie Buck in a court case (Buck v. Bell) designed to set a precedent for the constitutionality of sterilization laws and protect practicing members of the eugenics community from prosecution. Lombardo successfully uses the narrative of the 1927 Buck v. Bell case to tie together different arguments and topics relating to the legal, political, and scientific (or lack of scientific) history of the eugenics movement and then shifts from the story of Buck v. Bell to its implications in current legal history. Continue reading

The Girls by Emma Cline

Spoiler alert: This review has all the spoilers for The Girls. Although, I’m not sure how you don’t know what this book is about by now (it was ALL over bookstagram last summer) and how you haven’t come to the conclusion that it ends with a murder.

Emma Cline’s debut novel The Girls made a splash in the summer of 2016. Readers loved the story of Evie, a girl who flirts with joining a cult as she grows away from her mother and her former best friend and becomes entranced by a girl—Suzanne. The novel ends with gruesome murders, which leaves Evie questioning what she was and is capable of.

It was really hard for me to get into this novel for two reasons: The jumps between the past and the present were confusing at the beginning of the novel, and Cline’s word choices jarred me. Continue reading

The Constitution Today by Akhil Reed Amar

Akhil Reed Amar tries to do a lot of things in his most recent book The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era. He acknowledges his ambitious goals in his lengthy introduction where he writes that he is offering three books in one: a book on constitutional substance, a book on constitutional method, and a book on constitutional time. Amar explains that he wants to help readers understand the Constitution by presenting a survey of contemporary constitutional law, a lesson in how to do constitutional law, and a reflection in the tensions between constitutionalism and journalism. Continue reading

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